Blogging Prompts

Below, you’ll find instructions for all of the out-of-class required blog posts.

These instructions assume two things: 1) you have read the “How to Make a Blog Post” handout on our course website, and 2) you have read and followed the instructions for the “How to Set Up a WordPress Account” handout on our course website.

Blog Post #1: Due Jan. 11th, before class
Step 1: After having read the assigned reading both for January 9th and for January 11th (see syllabus), write a blog post that summarizes one of the concepts discussed. Explain why you find this concept interesting and why you think it’s important to consider when discussing contemporary activism. Please make sure to identity pages in MLA format that you are referring to and please do use direct quotes when/where possible. You can feel free to connect your thoughts to other ideas/issues concerning activism outside the scope of the readings (perhaps think about what brought you to this class…).

Step 2: Comment on at least one of your peers’ posts. Your comment should engage with their analysis – either further deepening what they have already started, or perhaps making a critical connection to another part of the reading/outside idea.

Blog Post #2: Due Jan. 15th, before class
Step 1: For this blog post, I’d like for you to start brainstorming a list of possible research topics related to activism. First, briefly introduce five different possible research topics you find interesting, important, and worthy of intellectual inquiry. Then, choose one of these five to write a more in-depth paragraph about (you may have to do a bit of research already!). Convince your readers that this topic deserves and needs scholarly attention. (This doesn’t have to be the topic you actually commit yourself to, but wouldn’t it be nice if you could use this blog posting as a jumping off point for your proposal rough draft that is due later in the week?) (*Yes, you can choose to research something directly related to course materials, though this is not mandatory. The only stipulation is that your research must engage with the idea of activism).

Step 2: Respond to at least one of your peers’ posts by replying with a thoughtful and engaging short paragraph of your own. This response should be aimed at helping your peer further zero in on or specify their research interest. You might ask leading questions, share materials, and/or offer suggestions. This should be a moment of community building where you practice the ethics of generosity in supporting each other in your various research endeavors.

Blog Post #3: Due Feb. 8th, before class
Step 1: Begin this blog posting by providing a link to your infographic (if you don’t have a link, then save your PDF infographic to a google docs folder and create a shareable link). This blog post will be due a week after your Genre Modes presentation and days after your final Research Proposal has been turned in. In this blog posting, you should reframe your research focus in light of your Proposal revisions and feedback from the Genre Modes assignment. What feedback did you receive during peer review on the written proposal that helped you further solidify your research topic/position? What feedback did you receive during the Genre Modes presentation to help you further specify your topic? This blog post consists of three different parts: 1) the link to your infographic, 2) a short description of the feedback (not all of the feedback, but the feedback that helped further your thinking and traction on your research topic), and 3) a reframing/reiteration of your research question and your tentative thesis.

Step 2: Respond to at least one of your peers’ posts by replying with a thoughtful and engaging short paragraph of your own. You might ask for further clarification or make other suggestions for further inquiry.

Blog Post #4: Due Feb. 22nd, before class
Step 1: Transcribe your research question and then answer this research question with a robust “thesis moment.” Your thesis moment should concisely introduce your topic, quickly define important concepts, and present an arguable position. I’d also like for you to provide a kind of “road mapping” (you may or may not keep this in the revised version of later drafts). The road mapping should indicate the various parts of your argument and how you plan to strategically make those points (you may even refer to specific readings, examples, or other evidence you plan to rely on).

Step 2: Respond to at least one of your peers’ posts by replying with a thoughtful and engaging short paragraph of your own. You might ask for further clarification or make other suggestions for further inquiry.

EXTRA CREDIT:
Blog Post #5: Due. March 15th
Step 1: After having listened to all of your classmates’ presentations, answer the following questions:

  1. What presentation made you want to know more about the topic and why?
  2. What presentation do you feel taught you the most about its topic? What did it teach you?
  3. What presentation surprised you the most? Why/how?
  4. What presentation inspired you the most and why?

 

A Stanford PWR 2 Course

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